Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A large shallow pan in which milk is kept to allow the cream to rise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A very frequent aspect of pahoehoe is the likeness on a magnificent scale of a thick coat of cream drawn in wrinkling folds to the side of a milk-pan.

    The Hawaiian Archipelago

  • In a little while he reappeared carrying a milk-pan filled with comb-honey.

    The Wrong Woman

  • A day or two ago one was found drowned in the milk-pan, this morning a second in the water-pail, and a third in the milk-jug.

    Three Years in Tristan da Cunha

  • There was everything in size from an ordinary cup to a milk-pan and one much battered long-handled dipper.

    The American Missionary — Volume 43, No. 04, April, 1889

  • Whenever Vogel and Zimmerman and Zadkiel saw him coming with the milk-pan they expressed their joy by saucy little barks and yelps, and made a headlong but awkward rush towards him, and when he put down the pan they weren't content to simply put their heads over the side and lap.

    Little Folks (Septemeber 1884) A Magazine for the Young

  • The kettle was ticking on the back of the range, a scoured empty milk-pan awaited the milk-man.

    Saturday's Child

  • While the older man stood about and vainly tried to impress people who came in and asked questions which invariably had to be referred to his repair boy, the precocious expert stripped the wheel down to something that looked to Claire distressingly like an empty milk-pan.

    Free Air

  • And the only colander we have was made out of a leaky milk-pan with holes punched in its bottom.

    The Prairie Wife

  • The children wanted to play with it; but the Duckling thought they wanted to hurt it, and in its terror fluttered up into the milk-pan, so that the milk spurted down into the room.

    The Ugly Duckling

  • The children wanted to play with it; but the Duckling thought they would do it an injury, and in its terror fluttered up into the milk-pan, so that the milk spurted down into the room.

    Children's Literature A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes

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