Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Believing erroneously; holding a false doctrine; especially, believing a false religion.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of misbelieve.
  • noun The refusal to believe something; disbelief, or an instance of this.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From misbelieve +‎ -ing.

Examples

  • I saw his handouts in Lake County, they were so negative and misbelieving that I couldn't believe it.

    Awaiting one county

  • Veiler, I will not go hence till I do to death all the misbelieving

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Unitarian fell upon the misbelieving Persians in the gates, and the blood of the Kafirs ran in the streets like a torrent till they threw down their arms and harness and called out for quarter; whereupon the Moslems stayed their swords from the slaughter and drove them to their tents, as one driveth a flock of sheep.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • From this misbelieving feacemaker to his noncredible fancyflame. 1 Ask for bosthoon, late for Mass, pray for blaablaablack sheep.

    Finnegans Wake

  • Silver, for many misbelieving men, and many Christian men also, have gone often time for to take of the Thresoure that there was of old, and have pilled the Thresoure, wherefore there is none left.

    Letters to Dead Authors

  • The tactics of fear that Karl Rove and the Republican Party had perfected in the last three elections had fallen on jaded, misbelieving ears.

    The Aftermath of the Candidate's Debate

  • Wherefore many misbelieving men, and many Christian men also, go in oftentime for to have of the treasure that there is; but few come again, and namely of the misbelieving men, ne of the

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Insomuch, that one good Christian man in good belief should overcome and out-chase a thousand cursed misbelieving men, as David saith in the Psalter,

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Wherefore every good Christian man, that is of power, and hath whereof, should pain him with all his strength for to conquer our right heritage, and chase out all the misbelieving men.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • And when my fellows and I saw that, when we came in we did off our shoes and came in bare-foot, and thought that we should do as much worship and reverence thereto, as any of the misbelieving men should, and as great compunction in heart to have.

    The Travels of Sir John Mandeville

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