Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of misinstruct.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • One explanation for the possible not guilty verdict, for the not guilty verdict on the conspiracy charge, on that charge the judge admitted yesterday that he may have misinstructed the jury on the law of armed conflict, and that could have had direct bearing on them determining that Hamdan did not meet the criteria for a guilty verdict on that count.

    CNN Transcript Aug 6, 2008

  • The first count, which got to the heart of the matter of whether or not Salim Hamdan was guilty of a war crime, is a count on which the judge yesterday, admitted he may have misinstructed the jury.

    CNN Transcript Aug 6, 2008

  • If voters in Jacksonville, African-American voters had not been misinstructed how to vote, most likely their votes would have been counted for Al Gore, instead of being spoiled, and Gore might have won Florida.

    CNN Transcript - Breaking News: Election 2000: Action Grinding to a Halt in Tallahassee - December 13, 2000

  • Such is the inconsistency of untutored folly, and the fate of misinstructed superstition; the power of superior cunning, and the effect of unprincipled deceit.

    The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson, Volume 2

  • “I am afraid, sir,” said his Highness, “you have been sadly misinstructed in this case.”

    The Reminiscences Of Sir Henry Hawkins

  • Such is the inconsistency of untutored folly, and the fate of misinstructed superstition; the power of superior cunning, and the effect of unprincipled deceit.

    The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson

  • It is thus, COMETS present themselves so unexpectedly to man's wondering eyes; their eccentric motion disturbs the tranquillity of his planetary system; they excite the terror of the misinstructed to whom every thing unusual is marvellous.

    The System of Nature, Volume 1

  • “The first and the last, the beginning and the end, it may well be; but in the middle, many things will still be wanting to an artist, if instruction, and early instruction too, have not previously made that of him which he was meant to be: and perhaps for the man of genius it is worse in this respect than for the man possessed of only common capabilities; the one may much more easily be misinstructed, and be driven far more violently into false courses, than the other.

    Chapter IX. Book II

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