Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A traditional English folk dance performed by a team of costumed dancers, often men but also men and women together or women only, who often wield sticks or handkerchiefs.
  • v. To perform in such a dance

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See Morris.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dance of persons in costume, especially of persons wearing hoods and dresses tagged with bells; also, any mumming performance in which dancing played a conspicuous part.
  • n. A kind of country-dance still popular in the north of England.
  • n. Also called Morisco, Moor-dance, and formerly Moresque dance.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any of various English folk dances performed by dancers in costume

Etymologies

Thought to be from Moorish + dance. The German Moriskentanz is cognate. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • “I take it that this morris dance — cum-sword-dance-cum-mumming play — forgive me if I’ve got the terms muddled — is a survival of some such practice?”

    Death of a Fool

Comments

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  • That's funny, the same citation reminds me of "what the hell was THAT?"

    May 2, 2008

  • the below citation reminds me of hearing English words on Indian television! (the more 'hip' a programme, the more English vocabulary creeps in, I think)

    May 2, 2008

  • 1458 Will of Alice Wetenhale (P.R.O.: PROB. 11/4) f. 205v, Lego Caterine filie mee..iij ciphos argenti sculptos cum moreys daunce cum unico cooperculo ad eosdem.

    May 1, 2008

  • Yup. Check out some wiggy videos on YouTube.

    January 21, 2008

  • Morris dance is an ancient form of English folk dance usually accompanied by music. It is based on rhythmic stepping and the execution of choreographed figures by a group of dancers. Sticks, swords and handkerchiefs are also used. Mummers often accompany Morris dancers. It is traditionally part of May Day celebration. It has become a part of Beltane celebration in some forms of modern Wicca ritual.

    January 20, 2008