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Examples

  • “As a man of science, I have often thought that, for the sake of accuracy, they should be classified as a different species altogether—Homo enigma, perhaps, or Homo mortalis.”

    The Curse of the Wendigo

  • “As a man of science, I have often thought that, for the sake of accuracy, they should be classified as a different species altogether—Homo enigma, perhaps, or Homo mortalis.”

    The Curse of the Wendigo

  • “As a man of science, I have often thought that, for the sake of accuracy, they should be classified as a different species altogether—Homo enigma, perhaps, or Homo mortalis.”

    The Curse of the Wendigo

  • Erler, Michael, 2001, “Epicurus as deus mortalis: homoiosis theôi and Epicurean Self-Cultivation,” in Dorothea Frede and André Laks (eds.), Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology; Its Background and Aftermath, Leiden:

    Epicurus

  • Bellonius, Rondoletius, Hippolitus Salvianus, &c. [3326] Arcana coeli, naturae secreta, ordinem universi scire majoris felicitatis et dulcedinis est, quam cogitatione quis assequi possit, aut mortalis sperare.

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Granted: and there are things yet more unfortunate than this; but I will answer you: “Sors tua mortalis, non est mortale quod optas.” — “Mortal thy fate, thy wishes those of gods.”

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • Quum labor in damno est, crescit mortalis egestas.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • Quum labor in damno est, crescit mortalis egestas.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • = I have found no other instance in Ovid of this transferred sense of _hebetare_, but compare _Aen_ II 604-6 'omnem quae nunc obducta tuenti/mortalis hebetat uisus tibi ... nubem eripiam' and

    The Last Poems of Ovid

  • 'Nil igitur mors est ad nos neque pertinet hilum, quandoquidem natura animi mortalis habetur.'

    The Student's Companion to Latin Authors

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