Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • “I could not for a moment entertain the idea that the claims of our much-injured and long-suffering citizens … should be postponed or separated from the settlement of the boundary question.”

    A Country of Vast Designs

  • “I could not for a moment entertain the idea that the claims of our much-injured and long-suffering citizens … should be postponed or separated from the settlement of the boundary question.”

    A Country of Vast Designs

  • His goal for the Indians was, he said, high-minded: “to preserve this much-injured race” by transferring the tribes across the Mississippi, where “the remnant of that ill-fated race” would be “placed beyond the reach of injury or oppression, and . . . the paternal care of the General Government will hereafter watch over them and protect them.”

    The Chosen Peoples

  • His goal for the Indians was, he said, high-minded: “to preserve this much-injured race” by transferring the tribes across the Mississippi, where “the remnant of that ill-fated race” would be “placed beyond the reach of injury or oppression, and . . . the paternal care of the General Government will hereafter watch over them and protect them.”

    The Chosen Peoples

  • His goal for the Indians was, he said, high-minded: “to preserve this much-injured race” by transferring the tribes across the Mississippi, where “the remnant of that ill-fated race” would be “placed beyond the reach of injury or oppression, and . . . the paternal care of the General Government will hereafter watch over them and protect them.”

    The Chosen Peoples

  • I am, indeed, no shadow — I am a much-injured man, come to demand rights which have been unjustly withheld from me.

    Saint Ronan's Well

  • It is the story of a much-injured and revengeful Norse pilot, who, having the chance to drown his old enemies, Milord and Milady, saves them at the mute appeal of their blue-eyed English baby.

    Henrik Ibsen

  • It is the story of a much-injured and revengeful Norse pilot, who, having the chance to drown his old enemies, Milord and Milady, saves them at the mute appeal of their blue-eyed English baby.

    Henrik Ibsen

  • You must excuse me, Lovelace, from engaging in the office you would have me undertake, till I can be better assured you really intend honourably at last by this much-injured lady.

    Clarissa Harlowe

  • As to the suffering which has been already endured by your son, by his much-injured wife, and by yourself, I am aware that no redress can be given.

    John Caldigate

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