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Examples

  • He had shot big game in Siam, pearled in the Paumotus, visited Tolstoy, seen the Passion Play, and crossed the Andes on mule-back; while he was a living directory of the fever holes of West Africa.

    Chapter 14

  • I freight by wagon-road to the Reservation, and then mule-back on up the Klamath and clear in to the forks of Little Salmon.

    BY THE TURTLES OF TASMAN

  • They bore him with them on mule-back (he unknowing if he were carried or not) for three days, when he came to himself and said, “Where am I?”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • He traversed the mountain on mule-back, encountered no one, and arrived safe and sound at the residence of his “good friends,” the shepherds.

    Les Miserables

  • No roads, no electricity aand only accessible by one hour in a motorboat or 30 miles by mule-back.

    Down and out in Yelapa, Mexico: Survivor Puerto Vallarta, Episode 4

  • And tomorrow I leave for Yelapa, a fishing village only accessible by a one-hour boat ride or 30 miles by mule-back.

    Don't drink the water! Survivor Puerto Vallarta, Episode 3

  • Independently of this, our baggage — some twenty-five packages — was scattered all over the place on mule-back, some coming up from Santa Cruz, some from Laguna, and the smaller ones with us.

    The Romance of Isabel Lady Burton

  • I have but little confidence in their route-surveys: sights are taken from mule-back, and distances are judged by the eye.

    The Land of Midian

  • Moore, who had traveled throughout this region on horse and mule-back for eight weeks, videotaped over 100 peasants.

    National Forum Foundation

  • Our ascent to the theatre, the day after, proved to be a very steep one, of half an hour on mule-back; in making which, we scared two of those prodigious birds, the _ospreys_, who, having reconnoitred us, forthwith began to wheel in larger and larger sweeps, and at last made off for the sea.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844

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