Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See murrina.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • "It is to be noticed that we have these rich cassidoin vessels (called in Latin murrhina) from the East, and that from places otherwise not greatly renowned, but most within the kingdom of Parthia; howbeit the principal come from Carmania.

    Museum of Antiquity A Description of Ancient Life

  • Venice glasses, both for our wine and beer, than any of those metals or stone wherein before time we have been accustomed to drink; but such is the nature of man generally that it most coveteth things difficult to be attained; and such is the estimation of this stuff that many become rich only with their new trade unto Murana (a town near to Venice, situate on the Adriatic Sea), from whence the very best are daily to be had, and such as for beauty do well near match the crystal or the ancient _murrhina vasa_ whereof now no man hath knowledge.

    Chronicle and Romance (The Harvard Classics Series)

  • It is a world to see in these our days, wherein gold and silver most aboundeth, how that our gentility, as loathing those metals (because of the plenty) do now generally choose rather the Venice glasses, both for our wine and beer, than any of those metals or stone wherein before time we have been accustomed to drink; but such is the nature of man generally that it most coveteth things difficult to be attained; and such is the estimation of this stuff that many become rich only with their new trade unto Murana (a town near to Venice, situate on the Adriatic Sea), from whence the very best are daily to be had, and such as for beauty do well near match the crystal or the ancient murrhina vasa whereof now no man hath knowledge.

    Of the Food and Diet of the English. Chapter VI. [1577, Book III., Chapter 1; 1587, Book II., Chapter 6

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