music-mistress love

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A female teacher of music.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Though without any natural gift for music, she had received, some fifteen years earlier, the instruction which a music-mistress of the Faubourg Saint-Germain, a woman of genius who had been, towards the end of her life, reduced to penury, had started, at seventy, to give to the daughters and granddaughters of her old pupils.

    Swann's Way

  • The shaft went home, and the music-mistress had no occasion to complain again.

    Little Memoirs of the Nineteenth Century

  • As I had anticipated, Kondjé-Gul was shut up with her music-mistress.

    French and Oriental Love in a Harem

  • Miss Bey, the housekeeper Miss Winch, and the head music-mistress, irreverently called Old Tom by the girls, sat at a separate table, where, at dinner-time, they did all the carving, and snatched what little dinner they could get in the intervals, patiently and foolishly regardless of their own digestions.

    The Beth Book Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius

  • She was junior music-mistress at the high school for girls, and he mathematical master at the boys 'college hard by.

    A Sheaf of Corn

  • After careful consideration of her pupils 'best points, Miss Ledbury, the music-mistress, had at last compiled her list.

    For the Sake of the School

  • She had offered to pay liberally for her board while she stayed there and, during that visit, however long it should prove to be, they had been able to dispense with the services of Miss Hatch, the music-mistress, who came regularly every morning from ten till twelve and was a considerable drain on the net profits of the establishment.

    Sally Bishop A Romance

  • Hatch's services as music-mistress weighed ponderously in the balance, swung down the scales.

    Sally Bishop A Romance

  • The shaft went home, and the music-mistress had no occasion to complain again.

    Little Memoirs of the Nineteenth Century

  • Her own position in the community was of the humblest, for she had neither rank nor wealth to commend her; but her skill on the harpsichord had attracted the notice of the music-mistress and she had been enrolled in the convent orchestra before her novitiate was over.

    The Valley of Decision

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