Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of musketo.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The captives were exceedingly astonished at the suddenness of the attack, and declared that the yankees would rise up like musketoes out of a marsh, and kill them.

    The Yankee Tea-party Or, Boston in 1773

  • In warm weather, especially in the spring, the slaves keep up a smoke, or fire and smoke, all night, to drive away the gnats and musketoes, which are very troublesome in all the low country of the south; so much so that the whites sleep under frames with nets over them, knit so fine that the musketoes cannot fly through them.

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • In South Carolina musketoes swarm in myriads, more than half the year -- they are so excessively annoying at night, that no family thinks of sleeping without nets or

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • _ O Misery to the full! to see the aged sire beating off the swarms of gnats and musketoes in the warm weather, and shivering in the straw, or bending over a few coals in the winter, clothed in rags.

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • This place like all other marshes and swamps among the mountains is infested with innumerable swarms of horse flies and musketoes to the great annoyance of man and beast during the day but the cold air descending from the mountains at night compells them to seek shelter among the leaves and grass at an early hour.

    Journal of a Trapper

  • We have no musketoes but snakes are alarmingly frequent in these parts.

    Bill Arp from the uncivil war to date, 1861-1903,

  • At night doors and windows all closed to keep out the musketoes, that buzz and hum and bite continually.

    Diary of Jason Niles (1814-1894) : June 22, 1861-December 31, 1864,

  • In South Carolina musketoes swarm in myriads, more than half the year -- they are so excessively annoying at night, that no family thinks of sleeping without nets or "musketoe-bars" hung over their bedsteads, yet slaves are never provided with them, unless it be the favorite old domestics who get the cast-off pavilions; and yet these very masters and mistresses will be so kind to their horses as to provide them with fly nets.

    American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses

  • O misery to the full! to see the aged sire beating off the swarms of gnats and musketoes in the warm weather, and shivering in the straw, or bending over a few coals in the winter, clothed in rags.

    American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses

  • We found them almost everywhere overflowed; we were obliged to encamp on some driftwood -- the musketoes tormented us the whole night.

    Brackenridge's Journal of a Voyage up The Missouri River, in 1811

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