Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To mutiny.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A mutineer.
  • intransitive v. To mutiny.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A mutineer.
  • Mutinous.
  • To mutiny.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French mutiner.

Examples

  • I regret to say that this young nobleman ended his leave-taking by introducing a pretty woman, with very neat hands and ankles and a most mutine physiognomy, as his sister, informing me that she was also my wife pro temp.

    Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo

  • Whereupon, the whole Campe were in a mutine and marched in order of battayle to the mounte Auentine, where Virginius perswaded the

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • Wherin also was enacted, that the departure of the people, and mutine of the souldiours should be pardoned.

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • Appius perceiuing the constancie of Icilius, and that the people was in a great mutine and sturre, differred the cause of Virginia til the next daye: whose frends hoped by that time, that her father would be at home: wherefore with all expedition they addressed messengers vnto him in the campe, bicause the saufgarde of his doughter consisted in his presence.

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • Adele Chabot never looked so well; her costume was most becoming; she had put on her _air mutine_, and was admired by all that passed us.

    Valerie

  • States had their mightie assembly against him; how this wise enemie, with whom we are to deale, may but by prolonging to fight with vs, leaue vs occasions enough for our armie within few moneths to mutine and breake; or by keeping him in his townes leaue vs a spoyled field: where though our prouision may bee such of our owne as we starue [‘staure’ in source text — KTH] not, yet is our weaknesse in any strange country such, as with sicknes and miserie we shal be dissolued.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • States had their mightie assembly against him; how this wise enemie, with whom we are to deale, may but by prolonging to fight with vs, leaue vs occasions enough for our armie within few moneths to mutine and breake; or by keeping him in his townes leaue vs a spoyled field: where though our prouision may bee such of our owne as we starue [ 'staure' in source text -- KTH] not, yet is our weaknesse in any strange country such, as with sicknes and miserie we shal be dissolued.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 07 England's Naval Exploits Against Spain

  • “So farre as I vnderstand, all ye do mutine and grudge, because I (being vanquished with Loue) cannot be deuided nor yet content my selfe day nor night, from the presence of this Greeke.

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • _] Batten is to feed rankly.] [Footnote III. 126: _Hey-day in the blood_] This expression is occasionally used by old authors.] [Footnote III. 127: _Thou canst mutine_] _i. e._, rebel.] [Footnote III. 128: _As will not leave their tinct.

    Hamlet

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