Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of muzhik.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But spoke that - « firemen which extinguished a fire there, by turns washed in a showersoul groups, and muzhiks because of an irradiation were shone in darkness, but to live ithim remains few hours ».

    Dan Klein on Austrian Vices - The Austrian Economists

  • The muzhiks, emancipated from the paternal care of their masters, would wreak havoc on the countryside.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • To gallop over the countryside on a fast horse, to plough a field of maize with his muzhiks, to commune with nature, to make love to a pretty peasant girl—what was politics to that?

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • The landlords, with their own unreasonable demands, could not be disposed of quite so easily as the muzhiks.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • Every day the muzhiks—the peasants—came to Tolstoy with another impossible demand.

    FORGE OF EMPIRES 1861-1871

  • I used to like to think it wasn't true that the muzhiks crave the knout.

    Time's Person of the Year.

  • And though, at first, your husband may find fault with you, he will afterwards take to boasting to other muzhiks that he has a wife who can do everything, and remain ever as bright and loving as the month of May.

    Through Russia

  • The muzhiks generally touch them with their fingers; the dealers gaze seriously at them; serving boys and apprentices laugh, and tease each other with the coloured caricatures; old lackeys in frieze cloaks look at them merely for the sake of yawning away their time somewhere; and the hucksters, young Russian women, halt by instinct to hear what people are gossiping about, and to see what they are looking at.

    The Mysterious Portrait

  • The muzhiks generally touch them with their fingers, the dealers gaze seriously at them; serving boys and apprentices laugh, and tease each other with the coloured caricatures; old lackeys in frieze cloaks look at them merely for the sake of yawning away their time somewhere; and the hucksters, young Russian women, halt by instinct to hear what people are gossiping about, and to see what they are looking at.

    Taras Bulba and Other Tales

  • Ivan Ivanovitch had been to town, to the mower's, and at the farm, and had succeeded in asking all the muzhiks and women whom he met all manner of questions.

    Taras Bulba and Other Tales

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