Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A gelatinous albuminoid compound closely allied to protoplasm, of which the putrefaction-bacteria are composed.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Biol.), archaic The protoplasmic matter of which bacteria are composed.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A food product derived from fungus, the basis of Quorn.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

myco- +‎ protein

Examples

  • Approved for sale in the U.K. in the 1980s, Quorn's so-called mycoprotein hit the grocery shelves in the form of meat-free burgers, cutlets, and in time, uniquely British things like "Cottage Pie," "Cornish Pasties," and "Toad in the Hole."

    Michael F. Jacobson: Meet Quorn: This Fungus Ain't No Portobello

  • Also avoid fungal proteins such as mycoprotein (Quorn).

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  • The company markets the fungus as a 'mycoprotein' similar to mushrooms.

    FoodQualityNews RSS

  • Critics of the labeling point out that few people know what mycoprotein is.

    Food Activist Fired Up Over 'Quorn'

  • CSPI director Mike Jacobson says it has received reports from more than 1,000 people in the UK who say they have been made sick by eating the mycoprotein.

    Is it time we all gave up meat?

  • This line of meat-free chicken-style nuggets and patties and meat-free hot dogs and meatballs are made with mycoprotein, an edible fungus such as truffles, morels, and mushrooms.

    The Small Change Diet

  • This line of meat-free chicken-style nuggets and patties and meat-free hot dogs and meatballs are made with mycoprotein, an edible fungus such as truffles, morels, and mushrooms.

    The Small Change Diet

  • Flavourings and egg albumen were added to bind it and "mycoprotein" was born.

    Is it time we all gave up meat?

  • Quorn says it convened a panel of independent allergy specialists and toxicologists in January who were paid an honorarium to review the safety of mycoprotein.

    Is it time we all gave up meat?

  • This essentially tasteless mycoprotein from myco-, “related to fungi” can then be manufactured into meat substitutes and a variety of other food products.

    On Food and Cooking, The Science and Lore of the Kitchen

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