Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The formation of muscle tissue during the development of an embryo

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • FHL3 inhibits myogenesis by binding MyoD and attenuating its transcriptional activity.

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  • An integration event at the RP11-156A1 locus of chromosome 2 revealed that kDNA appeared to rupture the ADAM 23 ORF involved in important cell functions related to development, fertilization, myogenesis and neurogenesis.

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  • It was reported that ROCKs are required for myogenesis from embryonic fibroblasts

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  • O'Brien MA, Lockwood WL, Goldstein ES, Bodmer R, et al. (1995) Drosophila MEF2, a transcription factor that is essential for myogenesis.

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  • Given the importance of Duf during myogenesis, we asked if the intracellular domain of Duf contained any specific sites or regions that could reveal its downstream functions.

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  • In order to delineate putative signalling motifs or regions critical for Duf function during myogenesis, Duf

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  • Our results support the view that there may not be a difference in the requirement of gene products in the early versus later phases of fusion and all fusion molecules might be involved in activating and sustaining the fusion process albeit through different mechanisms early versus later on during myogenesis.

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  • Taylor MV (1998) Muscle development: a transcriptional pathway in myogenesis.

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  • Baylies MK, Michelson AM (2001) Invertebrate myogenesis: looking back to the future of muscle development.

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  • Schroter RH, Lier S, Holz A, Bogdan S, Klambt C, et al. (2004) kette and blown fuse interact genetically during the second fusion step of myogenesis in Drosophila.

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