Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of myosin.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Then why does no one call G proteins motors, despite the fact that they harness the energy from hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to cause a conformational change by the same mechanism seen in myosins and kinesins?

    Analogy, How Scientifically Powerful is It?

  • Are you trying to claim that the cores of myosins, kinesins, and G proteins don't have the same structure?

    Analogy, How Scientifically Powerful is It?

  • If you claim myosins, kinesins, and dyneins came about through a selected mutation process the argument by analogy inherent to the claim is that a stochastic process observed to allow beak adaptation in finches and the many observed examples of unicellular adaptation is capable of generating the examples cited.

    Analogy, How Scientifically Powerful is It?

  • Yes, and we still call dyneins, kinesins, and myosins "motors" despite the fact that none of them spin.

    Analogy, How Scientifically Powerful is It?

  • That metaphor doesn't even come close to the accuracy of our use of "walking" to describe the mechanisms of kinesin and the 2-headed unconventional myosins.

    Analogy, How Scientifically Powerful is It?

  • For example, we call myosins, kinesins, and dyneins "molecular motors," a lay person thinks of something spinning.

    Analogy, How Scientifically Powerful is It?

  • Toh-e A, Matsui Y (1998) Sro7p, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae counterpart of the tumor suppressor l (2) gl protein, is related to myosins in function.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • In fruit flies and frogs, for example, nonmuscle myosins contract the actin filaments to generate the compressive forces necessary for successful gastrulation-the first major shape-changing event of development.

    News from The Scientist

  • Activation of the so-called nonmuscle myosins causes the cytoskeleton to contract, much like an arm muscle does when it lifts a heavy object.

    News from The Scientist

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