Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • A Middle English form of merry.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Others are so notoriously sottish, that being over head and ears in the myrie puddle of gross ignorance, yet they will by no means see or acknowledge it.

    Primitive Psycho-Therapy and Quackery

  • +M+ to medelus, ne to myrie, but as mesure wole it meeue.

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • "Yea sewer," said a myry fellawe (for such as be myrie will make myrye jests) -- "even as good right as a pertre to yield peres, and praty pygys to eat them."'

    Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 460 Volume 18, New Series, October 23, 1852

  • I had fell downe in any dirty or myrie place, when he should have pulled me out either with ropes, or lifted me up by the taile, he would never helpe me, but lay me on from top to toe with a mighty staffe, till he had left no haire on all my body, no not so much as on mine eares, whereby I was compelled by force of blowes to stand up.

    The Golden Asse

  • And if by adversity I had fell downe in any dirty or myrie place, when he should have pulled me out either with ropes, or lifted me up by the taile, he would never helpe me, but lay me on from top to toe with a mighty staffe, till he had left no haire on all my body, no not so much as on mine eares, whereby I was compelled by force of blowes to stand up.

    The Golden Asse

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