Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of nanodisc.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    REALNEO for all - Regional Economics Action Links North East Ohio

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    REALNEO for all - Regional Economics Action Links North East Ohio

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    AustralianIT.com.au | Top Stories

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    AustralianIT.com.au | Top Stories

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    PhysOrg.com - latest science and technology news stories

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    AustralianIT.com.au | Top Stories

  • Laboratory tests found the so-called "nanodiscs", around 60 billionths of a metre thick, could be used to disrupt the membranes of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct.

    NEWS.com.au | Top Stories

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.