Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Archaic spelling of neck.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • If they be good we may sell them here for sixteene shillings and better the piece, wee would haue the whole skinnes that is, the necke and legges withal, for these that you sent now lacke their neckes and legges.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • If they be good we may sell them here for sixteene shillings and better the piece, wee would haue the whole skinnes that is, the necke and legges withal, for these that you sent now lacke their neckes and legges.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 03

  • Hee goeth alwaies upon his legs, and carrieth his hands clasped in the nape of his necke when he goeth upon the ground.

    Essays

  • Companion, having thus executed what they came for, proceeded yet in their cunning a little further; casting a strangling Cord about the necke of Churiacy, seemed as if they hugged and imbraced him: but drew it with so maine strength, that he never spake word after, and so threw him downe after the Prince.

    The Decameron

  • Some better assurance getting possession of her, as knowing him perfectly by his voice, and looking more stedfastly on his face, which constantly avouched him to be Theobaldo; the teares trickling amaine downe her faire cheekes, she ran to embrace him, casting her armes about his necke, and kissing him a thousand times, my faithfull husband, nothing in the world can be so welcom to me.

    The Decameron

  • When he, like a loyall and most honourable man, sharpely reprehended her fond and idle love: And when shee would have embraced him about the necke to have kissed him; he repulsed her roughly from him, protesting upon his honourable reputation, that rather then hee would so wrong his

    The Decameron

  • No sooner did Constance behold him, but she was ready to dye with conceite of joy, and being unable to containe her passion: sodainely she threw her armes about his necke, and in meere compassion of her many misfortunes, as also the instant solace of her soule (not being able to utter one word) the teares trickled abundantly downe her cheekes.

    The Decameron

  • Annointing his naked body with Hony, he then covered it over with downy small Feathers, and fastening a chaine about his necke, and a strange ugly vizard on his face, he gave him a great staffe in the one hand, and two huge Mastive dogs chained together in the other, which he had borrowed in the Butchery.

    The Decameron

  • Florence, because he thought the halter to be about his necke, and that there was no other helpe but hanging.

    The Decameron

  • After he had of entreated her in this manner, casting her armes about his necke, and sighing as if her heart would breake, thus she replyed.

    The Decameron

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