Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A book-shaped needlecase, having leaves of cloth into which the needles are stuck.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A book-shaped needlecase, having leaves of cloth into which the needles are stuck.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Pieces of cloth, kid, chamois, or other material, cut and sewed together in the form of the leaves of a book, and protected by book-like covers, used to contain needles, which are stuck into the leaves.

Etymologies

needle +‎ book (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • She would run off with your scissors, your bodkin, your needlebook, and your spool of cotton; she would stuff your handkerchief in her pocket by mistake; she'd break the strings of your bag, trying to open it; she'd try your spectacles on to her kitten, and tie your new tippet on the dog Ponto's neck.

    Little Ferns For Fanny's Little Friends

  • There was not much else in the box; a few ornaments, a little faded needlebook which looked as though it had been kept for memory's sake, and two letters.

    Glenloch Girls

  • Meanwhile the famous needlebook was in a fair way to be finished.

    The Wide, Wide World

  • In high glee Ellen ran for the pieces of Bristol board which were to form the backs of the needlebook, and brought them to the library; and explained how room was to be left in the middle of each for a painting,

    The Wide, Wide World

  • The arrangement of the painted needlebook was entirely decided upon in this consultation; also two or three other matters; and the two children seemed to have already lived a day since daybreak by the time they came down to breakfast.

    The Wide, Wide World

  • The tears were dried, in course of time, and the needlebook with its yellow pictures and pink edges was very neatly finished.

    The Wide, Wide World

  • I thought of making her a needlebook with white backs, and getting Gilbert Gillespie to paint them – he can paint beautifully, – and having her name and something else written very nicely inside – how do you think that would do?

    The Wide, Wide World

  • Embroidered needlebook of white satin with bright flowers, date 1800. 3.

    The Development of Embroidery in America

  • Embroidered needlebook of white satin with bright flowers and vines, dated 1786. 4.

    The Development of Embroidery in America

  • In high glee, Ellen ran for the pieces of Bristol board which were to form the backs of the needlebook, and brought them to the library; and explained how room was to be left in the middle of each for a painting, a rose on one, a butterfly on the other; the writing to be as elegant as possible, above, beneath, and roundabout, as the fancy of the writer should choose.

    The Wide, Wide World

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