Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A tavern or public-house permitted to be open during the night.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • After cursing the wiles of the little old hag, I covered my head and commenced to run through the middle of the night-house to the exit opposite, when, lo and behold! whom should I meet on the very threshold but Ascyltos himself, as tired as I was, and almost dead; you would have thought that he had been brought by the self-same little old hag!

    Satyricon

  • When you have gone a couple of miles, make a circumbendibus back again to the night-house frequented by your set, and relate the adventure, with the same voice and countenance as a broker quotes the price of stocks; then order a cool bottle of claret with the air of a man who has done a meritorious action!

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 53, No. 327, January, 1843

  • After cursing the wiles of the little old hag, I covered my head and commenced to run through the middle of the night-house to the exit opposite, when, lo and behold! whom should I meet on the very threshold but Ascyltos himself, as tired as I was, and almost dead; you would have thought that he had been brought by the self-same little old hag!

    The Satyricon — Complete

  • After cursing the wiles of the little old hag, I covered my head and commenced to run through the middle of the night-house to the exit opposite, when, lo and behold! whom should I meet on the very threshold but Ascyltos himself, as tired as I was, and almost dead; you would have thought that he had been brought by the self-same little old hag!

    The Satyricon — Volume 01: Introduction

  • But he did not remain one long; and became in turn a Fleet Street publican, the proprietor of a Haymarket night-house, an auctioneer, a picture dealer, a bill discounter (with a side line in usury), and the editor of a Sunday organ.

    The Magnificent Montez From Courtesan to Convert

  • No, he went by another road, even though it led to the narrow way, night-house and spider-forest.

    The Book of Wonder

  • The establishment has its "runners" and "ropers in," like the night houses, who are paid a percentage on the winnings from their victims, and the proprietor of the day-house is generally the owner of a night-house higher up town.

    The Secrets of the Great City

  • The vulgar and dishonest publican, who sold a _bona fide_ poison under a false name; the low tavern-keeper; the proprietor of the dram-shop; of the night-house; and the shebeen -- all were struck with terror and dismay.

    Phelim Otoole's Courtship and Other Stories Traits And Stories Of The Irish Peasantry, The Works of William Carleton, Volume Three

  • Page 37 mother's night-house, where I always lay with her, and coiled themselves into folds, and each time they crowed like a cock.

    The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African. Written by Himself. Vol. I.

  • I remember two of those ominous snakes, each of which was as thick as the calf of a man's leg, and in colour resembling a dolphin in the water, crept at different times into my mother's night-house, where I always lay with her, and coiled themselves into folds, and each time they crowed like a cock.

    The Life of Olaudah Equiano Or Gustavus Vassa The African

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