Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Among the voyageurs of the Northwest, a square piece cut from an old blanket and used especially to protect the feet when snow-shoes are worn, being wrapped in several thicknesses around the foot before the moccasin is put on.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • You seem now to have settled, and bien nippe at Dresden.

    Letters to his son on The Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman

  • Now, because it is needlesse to proceede any further, then what hath beene already spoken: let mee onely tell you (over and beside) and commit it to memorie, that the nature of meetings and speeches are such, as they ought to nippe or touch the hearer, like unto the Sheepes nibling on the tender grasse, and not as the sullen Dogge byteth.

    The Decameron

  • Or when ye giue a mocke vnder smooth and lowly wordes as he that hard one call him all to nought and say, thou art sure to be hanged ere thou dye: quoth th'other very soberly, Sir I know your maistership speakes but in iest, the Greeks call it (_charientismus_) we may call it the priuy nippe, or a myld and appealing mockery: all these be souldiers to the figure

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • And besides, _Phanorinus_ being knowen for an Eunuke or gelded man, came by the same nippe to be noted as an effeminate and degenerate person.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • You seem now to have settled, and 'bien nippe' at Dresden.

    Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759-65

  • And besides, Phauorinus being knowen for an Eunuke or gelded man, came by the same nippe to be noted as an effeminate and degenerate person.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • Or when ye giue a mocke vnder smooth and lowly wordes as he that hard one call him all to nought and say, thou are sure to be hanged ere thou dye: quoth th'other very soberly Sir I know your maistership speakes but in iest, the Greeks call it (charientismus) we may call it the priuy nippe, or a myld and appeasing mockery: all these be souldiers to the figure allegoria and fight vnder the banner of dissimulation.

    The Arte of English Poesie

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