Definitions

from The American HeritageĀ® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A transparent, colorless to yellowish, fuming corrosive liquid, HNO3, a highly reactive oxidizing agent used in the production of fertilizers, explosives, and rocket fuels and in a wide variety of industrial metallurgical processes. Also called aqua fortis.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A transparent, colourless to pale yellow, fuming corrosive liquid, HNO3; a highly reactive oxidizing agent used in the production of fertilizers, explosives, and rocket fuels and in a wide variety of industrial processes; once called aqua fortis.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. a colorless or yellowish liquid obtained by distilling a nitrate with sulphuric acid. It is powerfully corrosive, being a strong acid, and in decomposition a strong oxidizer.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. acid used especially in the production of fertilizers and explosives and rocket fuels

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • When the boys finished eating, they hurried back to the launching area, where great tanks of nitric acid and liquid oxygen were being brought alongside the towering rocket.

    I, TOO, DREAM....

  • There had only been enough oxygen in Earth's atmosphere to make the oceans about one-hundredth-normal in nitric acid as it combined with the nitrogen, but rain, rivers, and even estuaries had often been much more concentrated during the fix.

    The Nitrogen Fix

  • As the woman had said, the jailbird's hair was long enough to suggest that outdoor attire was not usual for him, and dark enough to indicate little if any exposure to nitric acid rain.

    The Nitrogen Fix

  • The hundredth-normal nitric acid of the oceans was too dilute to color proteins, but the rain was sometimes another matter.

    The Nitrogen Fix

  • Medulic also worked with nitric acid on copper, and, according to some authorities, was the first to engrave with a dry needle.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 10: Mass Music-Newman

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