Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A serving of beer or spirits.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A dram of spirits.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A finishing stroke; a blow on the head.
  • n. A thimble-rigger's confederate.
  • n. A, dram of spirits.
  • n. A shingler. See puddle and puddler. Sometimes spelled knobbler.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And the mailman gulped down his 'nobbler' and turned to remount the lean chestnut, which was standing hitched to the palings, observing cheerfully:

    Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land

  • Perhaps the best story in the entire book is about Sub Pop receptionist Megan Jasper's interview with the New York Times in 1992, during which Ms. Jasper goofed on the stuffy paper of record by sharing all the lingo these wacky grunge kids in Seattle were supposedly using, including such gems as "cob nobbler" and "lamestain."

    The Seattle Sound

  • Seattle Scam cob nobbler Perhaps the best story in the entire book is about Sub Pop receptionist Megan Jasper's interview with the New York Times in 1992, during which Ms. Jasper goofed on the stuffy paper of record by sharing all the lingo these wacky grunge kids in Seattle were supposedly using, including such gems as "cob nobbler" and "lamestain."

    Week in Words

  • But it was useful to see hammer and nobbler used up close and personal, especially on a cabbage.

    Alons-y!

  • The glossary ran as a companion to a feature on grunge published in the Times 'Styles section, and included such terms as wack slacks (“Old ripped jeans”), dish (“desirable guy”), cob nobbler (“loser”), and lamestain (“uncool guy”).

    Remember the Grunge Hoax?

  • I suspect that Dave and his friends were swingin' on the flippety-flop and the New York Times is a cob nobbler.

    Archive 2007-07-01

  • Medlicot probably indulged in no such speculations; but the nobbler, when brought close to his lips, was grateful to him as to others.

    Harry Heathcote of Gangoil

  • Brownbie was regarded almost as the Evil One himself, and Jacko, knowing what mischief was, as it were, in the word, thought that he was entitled to bread and jam, if not to a nobbler itself, in bringing such tidings to Gangoil.

    Harry Heathcote of Gangoil

  • Harry Heathcote had another nobbler — being only the second in the day — and then went to bed.

    Harry Heathcote of Gangoil

  • There was always flour and meat to be had, generally tobacco, and sometimes even the luxury of a nobbler.

    Harry Heathcote of Gangoil

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