Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun See numbles.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun plural The entrails of a deer; the umbles.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative form of numbles.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Sir Tristrem himself, and wrangling and disputing with all around him concerning nombles, briskets, flankards, and raven-bones, then usual terms of the art of hunting, or of butchery, whichever the reader chooses to call it, which are now probably antiquated.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • I can wind my horn, though I call not the blast either a recheate or a morte — I can cheer my dogs on the prey, and I can flay and quarter the animal when it is brought down, without using the newfangled jargon of curee, arbor, nombles, and all the babble of the fabulous Sir

    Ivanhoe

  • I call not the blast either a _recheate_ or a _morte_ --- I can cheer my dogs on the prey, and I can flay and quarter the animal when it is brought down, without using the newfangled jargon of _curee, arbor, nombles_, and all the babble of the fabulous Sir Tristrem. ''

    Ivanhoe

  • Ta {n} sey is good/hote wortes, or gruell of befe or of motto {n} is good. [t]  Gelly, mortrus, creme almondes, blau {n} che manger, Iussell, and charlet, cabage, and nombles of a dere, ben good/

    Early English Meals and Manners

  • The English yeoman left for them a keg of ale, or a basket of loaves, beneath the hollins green, as sauce for their meal of "nombles of the dere."

    Hereward, the Last of the English

  • Nay, by my faith, if you be so heavy, I will content me with the best of you, and that’s the haunch and the nombles, and e’en heave up the rest on the old oak-tree yonder, and come back for it with one of the yauds.”

    The Monastery

  • I can wind my horn, though I call not the blast either a recheate or a morte -- - I can cheer my dogs on the prey, and I can flay and quarter the animal when it is brought down, without using the newfangled jargon of curee, arbor, nombles, and all the babble of the fabulous Sir Tristrem. "

    Ivanhoe. A Romance

  • Nay, by my faith, if you be so heavy, I will content me with the best of you, and that's the haunch and the nombles, and e'en heave up the rest on the old oak-tree yonder, and come back for it with one of the yauds. "

    The Monastery

  • I can flay and quarter the animal when it is brought down, without using the newfangled jargon of 'curee, arbor, nombles', and all the babble of the fabulous Sir Tristrem. "

    Ivanhoe

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