Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Omission of a party, plaintiff, defendant, or cause of action that should have been included as a part of an action or suit.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The omission of a party that was necessary to an action

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The omission of some person who ought to have been made a plaintiff or defendant in a suit, or of some cause of action which ought to be joined.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In law, the omission to join, as of a person as party to an action.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

non- +‎ joinder

Examples

  • The court – correctly, in my view – reads this to mean that there are two kinds of inventorship “errors” that the Commissioner may correct: misjoinder, i.e., naming a person incorrectly as the inventor, and b nonjoinder i.e., failing to name a person as an inventor.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Lowly Comma, Revisited

  • The court – again, correctly in my view – reads this as forbidding correction whenever an error of either kind misjoinder or nonjoinder arose with deceptive intention.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Lowly Comma, Revisited

  • Misjoinder can be corrected whether the error arose through deception or not; nonjoinder, though, can only be corrected where the error arose "without any deceptive intention" on the inventor's part.

    Libertarian Blog Place

  • Misjoinder can be corrected whether the error arose through deception or not; nonjoinder, though, can only be corrected where the error arose “without any deceptive intention” on the inventor’s part.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » The Lowly Comma, Revisited

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