Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Not having or leading to tenure.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Not possessing tenure.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But by not extending the contracts of nontenured faculty or by phasing out tenured positions over time, universities could seriously cut labor costs.

    Time to Make Professors Teach

  • Some nontenured lecturers earn less than $100 for each student they instruct.

    Putting a Price on Professors

  • But by not extending the contracts of nontenured faculty or by phasing out tenured positions over time, universities could seriously cut labor costs.

    Time to Make Professors Teach

  • In a comprehensive canvassing of court decisions based on teacher evaluation for compe tency, I found that the defendant districts prevailed in more than a 3-to-1 ratio, and that there was no significant difference between the outcomes for nontenured as compared to tenured teachers.

    The myth of teacher tenure

  • Streamlining should include lengthening the probationary period, elevating the standard for moving from nontenured to tenured status, and integrating a growth model of student achievement as a proportional, not primary, piece of the evaluation system.

    The myth of teacher tenure

  • About 38 percent of the nation's instructors are now part-timers, a category of nontenured itinerants.

    What To Chop

  • There are good P&T matters to report: More associate professors are talking about promotion, and we have more models for promotion in our nontenured full time ranks.

    Archive 2008-03-01

  • Well, Reality Check, what do you call it when younger/nontenured folk insistently direct an older female law professor to act more like their stereotype of an older female law professor?

    Pretty please.

  • Ann, how many of your peers move to nontenured positions?

    Apocalyptic politics.

  • I will only mention one, from David Riesman, who told of a case at the University of Chicago where a nontenured person who refused to give names was not only not terminated, but was defended in court at university expense.

    McCarthyism at Harvard

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