Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun someone who throws a noose

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The second nooser, who was a young active man, now crept in and took the noose, which hung suspended from Bulbul's collar, and holding it open in both his hands, slipped it adroitly under the huge hinder leg of the monster.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

  • The nooser now passed another noose under the other hind leg, which was secured like the first.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

  • She and her assistant, placing themselves one on each side of her, cut her off from her companions, and the nooser slipping a rope under her foot, Bulbul carried it to the nearest tree.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

  • She placed herself close to the leader, but it was to allow the nooser to stoop down under her, and to slip his noose round the hind foot of the wild one.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

  • She even, on another occasion, put her own foot under that of one of the wild ones, and kept it up till the nooser was able to slip the rope over it.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

  • Bulbul and her comrade now ranged up one on each side of the poor animal, and while, as it seemed, holding him in conversation, and consoling him for his misfortune, the active nooser slipped under them and secured the two fore-feet as he had done the first.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

  • At the same time, the courage and activity displayed by a Spanish piccador or matador is infinitely superior to that which a Singhalese nooser is compelled to exert.

    My First Voyage to Southern Seas

  • Siribeddi followed with the same listless step, and drew herself up close behind him, thus affording the nooser an opportunity to stoop under her and slip the noose over the hind foot of the wild one.

    Sketches of the Natural History of Ceylon

  • In tying up one of the larger elephants, he contrived before he could be hauled close up to the tree, to walk once or twice round it, carrying the rope with him; the decoy, perceiving the advantage he had thus gained over the nooser, walked up of her own accord, and pushed him backwards with her head, till she made him unwind himself again; upon which the rope was hauled tight and made fast.

    Sketches of the Natural History of Ceylon

  • I. Magnus, the flapper — nooser, master of the good lifebark Ulivengrene of Onslought, - and the homespund of her hearth, (Fuss his farther was the norse norse east and Muss his mother was a gluepot) and, gravydock or groovy anker, and a hulldread pursunk manowhood, who (with

    Finnegans Wake

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