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Etymologies

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Examples

  • The job won him an oak-leaf cluster for his Distinguished Service Medal, and the British named him an Honorary Knight Commander.

    A Covert Affair

  • Garet looked over where Chanlis hid in the oak-leaf bushes.

    Chanlis and Desira « A Fly in Amber

  • Hailing from a poor Catholic neighborhood in Buffalo, N.Y., Donovan 1883-1959 won early renown as the most-decorated officer of World War I, earning the Distinguished Service Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal with two oak-leaf clusters, two Purple Hearts and the Congressional Medal of Honor.

    The Spymaster's Spymaster

  • The job won him an oak-leaf cluster for his Distinguished Service Medal, and the British named him an Honorary Knight Commander.

    A Covert Affair

  • "Stoli and a fantastic cold-water platza oak-leaf beating."

    Feasting and Sweating to the Stoli

  • “I received the Purple Heart for the first incident and two oak-leaf clusters for the subsequent wounds.”

    Betrayed

  • “I received the Purple Heart for the first incident and two oak-leaf clusters for the subsequent wounds.”

    Betrayed

  • In the years between my marriages -- the 1980s and '90s -- I'd usually wind up at a friend's Thanksgiving celebration as a stray, and often had a fine time, except when it rained and I'd have to maneuver in the dark, on oak-leaf slicked winding roads back to my Westchester house.

    Lea Lane: Two Faraway Thanksgivings, And What I Learned

  • Although these look complex, all you really need to notice is whether the person is wearing a chevron or “stripes” (meaning he is enlisted), metallic bars (a junior officer or warrant officer), oak-leaf clusters (a midlevel officer), or eagles or stars (a senior officer).

    Married to the Military

  • Although these look complex, all you really need to notice is whether the person is wearing a chevron or “stripes” (meaning he is enlisted), metallic bars (a junior officer or warrant officer), oak-leaf clusters (a midlevel officer), or eagles or stars (a senior officer).

    Married to the Military

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