Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Egg-shaped and solid, with the narrow end at the base.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • In natural history, shaped like an egg with the narrow end forming the base; solidly obovate.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Approximately obovate in shape.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

obovate +‎ -oid

Examples

  • FRUITS: Pods short, to 2.5 cm, oblong to obovoid with a recurved style base.

    Chapter 7

  • An erect, herbaceous, dichotomously branched perennial, 60-180 cm high, with large, fleshy, cylindrical, obovoid subterranean rhizomes, large lanceolate leaves and white flowers arranged in twin clusters, which very rarely produce red seeds.

    Chapter 10

  • Grain is narrow, obovoid, biconvex, with two grooves on the anterior side and with a long embryo.

    A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses

  • Grain is minute, globose, obgloboid or obovoid, free in the glume and the palea.

    A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses

  • The grain is obovoid, truncate at the apex, and with a small white swelling in the centre at the apex, rugulose, red-brown.

    A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses

  • Spikelets 1/20 to 1/6 inch long; grain obovoid; stamens 2; panicle narrow interrupted, 6 to 18 inches long 1.

    A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses

  • Spikelets are obovoid or lanceolate, 1 - to 2-flowered, persistent on their stalks, one to three in an involucel.

    A Handbook of Some South Indian Grasses

  • Fruit oblong, or obovoid, the husk separating into four parts; nut smooth or angled, bony, incompletely two to four-celled.

    The Pecan and its Culture

  • Basidiospores continuous or rarely septate, globose, obovoid, ellipsoidal to oblong, smooth or roughened, hyaline or colored, borne singly at the apex of sterigmata.

    Studies of American Fungi. Mushrooms, Edible, Poisonous, etc.

  • He declares that on the same branch of oak he has noted the following variations: (1) In the length of the petiole, as one to three; (2) in the form of the leaf, being either elliptical or obovoid; (3) in the margin being entire, or notched, or even pinnatifid;

    Darwinism (1889)

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