old-fashionedness love

old-fashionedness

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The property or condition of being old-fashioned; similarity to what is now past or out of date; retention of characteristics formerly prevalent but now exceptional.
  • noun Conduct or demeanor resembling that of an old person; precociousness.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the property of being no longer fashionable

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I was just wondering, and you can put it down to my old-fashionedness, if it would have any kind of a negative impact on the boys?

    As Husbands Go

  • I was just wondering, and you can put it down to my old-fashionedness, if it would have any kind of a negative impact on the boys?

    As Husbands Go

  • To her relief, for all their old-fashionedness, the Shadowhunters seemed to believe in modern plumbing and hot and cold running water.

    City of Glass

  • Her having you on all fours in her surgery seems a trifle unconventional if you'll excuse my old-fashionedness!

    Went to My Doctor

  • To her relief, for all their old-fashionedness, the Shadowhunters seemed to believe in modern plumbing and hot and cold running water.

    Cassandra Clare: The Mortal Instrument Series

  • Anyway: on the surface, the old-fashionedness is in the freedom.

    The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of 4 Sisters, 2 Rabbits and a Very Interesting Boy

  • Anyway: on the surface, the old-fashionedness is in the freedom.

    Archive 2006-01-01

  • What may have smelled sharp, bitter, spicy, acrid and dry at first – with a dash of aldehydes for a good measure of old-fashionedness – turned into a quite interesting yet very wearable fragrance.

    Archive 2006-05-01

  • There's some cognitive dissonance between the modernity of the format and the old-fashionedness of the content - it is of British soldiers in riot gear on the streets of Belfast.

    The Guardian Reviewed

  • Poor Starkey, when young, had that peculiar stamp of old-fashionedness in his face which makes it impossible for a beholder to predicate any particular age in the object.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 85, November, 1864

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