Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • For a moment or two I stood listening to the jink-jink-jingle sound, and then just beyond the silhouetted branches, down the center of the lighted street, there it came, the only kind of vehicle that could move on a night like this: a light, airy, one-seated sleigh drawn by a single slim horse trotting easily and silently through the snow.

    Time and Again

  • A one-seated buggy is Cupid's most formidable chariot.

    The Kentucky Ranger

  • "They will send down bye-and-bye for your luggage; it's only a one-seated affair outside."

    Medoline Selwyn's Work

  • The church [39] is of brick, in a grove of very beautiful live-oak trees wreathed with grapevines and hanging moss, under which were tied every conceivable description of horse and vehicle, from Mr. Pierce's six-seated carriage and pair of fine Northern horses to the one-seated sulkies, and mules saddled with cotton-bags.

    Letters from Port Royal Written at the Time of the Civil War (1862-1868)

  • Holman had only a one-seated buggy, so the two sisters drove and we preachers walked.

    Personal Experiences of S O Susag

  • He drove around Wetona in a sagging, one-seated cart and never made any money because he did honest work and charged as little for it as men who did not.

    One Basket

  • Old Captain Semple, in his rickety one-seated buggy, drove up the beach, the water rising in the wheel-tracks.

    The Heart of Rachael

  • Two officers and a courier with a folding bicycle, besides the Minister of War, had to be tucked away in a one-seated car.

    Six Red Months in Russia: An Observer's Account of Russia Before and During the Proletarian Dictatorship

  • The one-seated enemy machines never ventured out except in groups, and even with the advantage of two against one refused to fight.

    Georges Guynemer

  • On another occasion, November 9, he waged six battles with one-seated and two-seated machines, all of which made their escape, one after another, by diving.

    Georges Guynemer

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.