Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The branch of biology that deals with the structure and function of organs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. the study of the organs of plants and animals
  • n. the study of musical instruments in relation to history, culture, and construction.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The science of organs or of anything considered as an organic structure.
  • n. That branch of biology which treats, in particular, of the organs of animals and plants. See Morphology.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A branch of biology which treats in particular of the different organs of animals and plants with reference to structure and function.
  • n. Phrenology.
  • n. The study of structure or organization.
  • n. In music, the science of musical instruments.
  • n. The science, history, and mechanics of the pipe-organ.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He gave his version of organology a new name—phrenology—and took his show on the road, playing to even fuller houses than Gall had, not as a scientist, however, but as an entertainer.

    MANUFACTURING DEPRESSION

  • In 1695, James Talbot, the scholar to whom modern organology owes so much, describes the tuning of the angélique.

    Archive 2009-04-01

  • Josephine Yannacopoulou, 30, a PhD student of medieval organology, says she was "hijacked" by the instrument while researching her thesis on an ancient Mexican dance, which transferred to France in medieval times and became the formal "gigue", performed at court in the ballet style.

    Archive 2007-05-01

  • The chick is used for the primary relations of the systems to one another; and this is followed by the study of pig embryos, where each system is taken up separately and the organology and histogenesis of its parts are studied.

    University of Virginia Record

  • But where he set his stamp has been upon style; style in its widest sense, not merely on the grammar and mechanism of writing, but on what De Quincey described as its _organology_; style, that is to say, in its relation to ideas and feelings, its commerce with thought, and its reaction on what one may call the temper or conscience of the intellect.

    Critical Miscellanies, Volume I (of 3) Essay 4: Macaulay

  • Of course no intelligent person supposes the psychological maps and busts of the organs to be representations of the brain, or anything more than approximations to the true interior organology, which, however, do not lead to any great error, as adjacent portions of convolutions have very analogous functions.

    Buchanan's Journal of Man, April 1887 Volume 1, Number 3

  • If we thus go through the catalogue of psychic powers or qualities, we observe finally that the organs are grouped as follows; and this grouping should be impressed upon the memory, as it is easily learned, and serves as a basis for the further study of organology.

    Buchanan's Journal of Man, March 1887 Volume 1, Number 2

  • THE RECTIFICATION OF CEREBRAL SCIENCE, commenced in this number, will be continued in the November number, bringing the science up to its present condition, and showing how, after the rectification is completed, the science attains a grand simplicity, and, instead of being puzzled by cerebral organology, a very brief instruction will enable us to master the subject.

    Buchanan's Journal of Man, October 1887 Volume 1, Number 9

  • New Orleans in the old organology, giving him six lessons in exchange for his instructions in Spanish.

    Buchanan's Journal of Man, October 1887 Volume 1, Number 9

  • In that of Spurzheim the intermediate spaces were occupied and the entire exterior surface of the brain devoted to organology, yet still the basilar and interior surface of the brain remained unknown to Spurzheim, and the exterior regions which he supposed entirely occupied by his organs were but half occupied by them.

    Buchanan's Journal of Man, October 1887 Volume 1, Number 9

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