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Examples

  • A round-faced, stocky Russian cameraman, osten - sibly a member of the television crew but actually a high official assigned to the Polish talks by the Kremlin, studied the fifty-nine - year-old housewife with disbelief: How dare this peasant woman come before an arm of government and publicly bring such charges?

    Poland

  • Both Rousset and Raymond use Wölfflin's categories as their starting point: Rousset devises a new dichotomy: Circe and the Peacock, the principle of metamorphosis and the principle of osten - tation.

    BAROQUE IN LITERATURE

  • ` The grandees of Spain, 'he says, ` had a generous osten tation; this was to divide the money won at play among all the bystanders, of whatever condition.

    The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims, In All Times and Countries, especially in England and in France

  • Serios irritatos, qaod petenti sibi adTersom Alanos aoxilia ne - gasset Yespasianos, Sjriam inradere pa - ratit qoidem, sed cohibitos est osten - tata armorom meto a Sjriae praeside Trajano IVajani * Aog. patre, ot pro - babimos in nomis Trajani ad annom Y. 0. 867.

    Doctrina nvmorvm vetervm conscripta a Josepho Eckhel ..

  • His movement was disguised by the osten - sible pretext of hastening to secure a convoy, given out to be on its way from Virginia, which might be taken or destroyed by the loyalists of North Carolina, when passing through their neighborhood: in con - currence with which pretence, Lee was ordered to proceed in the direction of Cambden until he reached the course carrying him through the pine barren into the tract of country inhabited by well affected citizens.

    Memoirs of the war in the Southern department of the United States

  • But whatever Spirit there may be in anon) nmus Reviews, it appears to me to be as easy to be brave at the risk and hazard of an Editor, (since he is the only osten - sible person,) us it i« to be generous at another man's expense.

    Hypocrisy. A satire, in three books. Book the first

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