Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Indicating duty or obligation.
  • v. Indicating advisability or prudence.
  • v. Indicating desirability.
  • v. Indicating likelihood or probability.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the majority of the religions of the world, there is no trace of Totemism, vestiges of which ought to be widespread if it had been the source of all other forms of religion.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • He is the creator of the universe, is neither perfect, nor the author of evil, but ought to be called just.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • If the Council deems any derogation from the common law useful, it ought to send a postulatum to the pope.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Paul, speaking to King Agrippa, said, I used to believe that I ought to do everything I could to oppose the followers of Jesus of Nazareth.

    The Courage To Be Christian

  • If the beautiful June Gale's face could be stretched to look like mine, then it seemed there ought to be a way to unstretch my face so it looked like hers.

    Change Me Into Zeus’s Daughter

  • “You ought to go talk to them” Gene Matranga to author, Dec. 12, 2002, p.

    First Man

  • By terming their branch of knowledge a philosophical science, it is implied that psychology ought to include not only a doctrine of the laws of succession and concomitance of our conscious states, but an inquiry into their ultimate cause.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Resentments increased, and conversations behind his back centered on whether he ought to be on the team at all.

    I Used to Have a Handle on Life But It Broke

  • + The legislator may revoke his concession either formally, or implicitly by a contrary law containing the clause "notwithstanding all privileges to the contrary" or even, "notwithstanding all privileges the tenor of which ought to be reproduced textually".

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

  • Public acts, official records, ought to be either the originals (engrossed) or authentic copies, i.e., certified to be faithful copies of the original preserved in the protocol, the notary who transcribes the document witnessing on the copy itself that it is exact; this is what is known as fides instrumentorum, or trustworthiness of the documents.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 12: Philip II-Reuss

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