Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Not living within a college; not taking place within the bounds of a college.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And so his fame travelled far beyond his own collegiate walls, and out-college honourables and gentlemen-commoners were content to make the acquaintance, and eat the dinners that were so freely offered.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 349, November, 1844

  • Five minutes after, Solomon the porter, summoned from his bed just as he had made himself snug once more after letting out Horace's out-college friends, confronted Mr Perkins in about as sweet a temper as that worthy individual himself, with this difference, that one was sulky and the other furious.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 58, Number 358, August 1845

  • The Bradder was dining with the Mohocks that evening, and when the out-college men had gone away he asked me to come to his rooms and have

    Godfrey Marten, Undergraduate

  • Sometimes I think that our college is a bad specimen, for I have made several friends amongst out-college men.

    Tom Brown at Oxford

  • "Oh," said Tom, not much wiser for the information, but resolved to waylay Hardy as soon as the hall was over, and highly delighted to find that they were after all of the same college; for he had already begun to find out, that however friendly you may be with out-college men, you must live chiefly with those of your own.

    Tom Brown at Oxford

  • The best men amongst them, too, were diligent readers of the _Tracts for the Times_, and followers of the able leaders of the High-church party, which was then a growing one; and this led them also to form such friendships as they made amongst out-college men of their own way of thinking-with high churchmen, rather than St. Ambrose men.

    Tom Brown at Oxford

  • All passed off well and quietly; the out-college men were gone, the lights were out, and the butler had locked the hall door by a quarter past eleven, and the Dean returned in peace to his own rooms.

    Tom Brown at Oxford

  • It was now verging towards twelve o'clock; the out-college members of the party had all taken their leave; Miller and Fane, having finished their grilled chicken at a little table in the corner, had now drawn round the fire with the three or four of us who remained, and there was a debate as to the expediency of brewing more punch, when we heard a running step in the Quadrangle, which presently began to ascend the staircase in company with a not very melodious voice, warbling in a style which bespoke the owner's high state of satisfaction.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846

  • Crowds of out-college men were here to see him come in to-night. "

    Godfrey Marten, Undergraduate

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