Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To outperform; to outdo.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To surpass in a rivalry.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To surpass; excel.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. be more of a rival than

Etymologies

out- +‎ rival (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • “I want them to outrival in splendor those for any of her predecessors.”

    The Tudors: King Takes Queen

  • He already suspected -- from a brief but polite exchange of words with the class president -- that their language ability might outrival the simple lessons he had developed for his Bible study class.

    Excerpt: Heaven Lake by John Dalton

  • Affection twined with their life, which no shocks of feeling can uproot, which little quarrels only trample an instant that it may spring more freshly when the pressure is removed: affection that no passion can ultimately outrival, with which even love itself cannot do more than compete in force and truth.

    Shirley, by Charlotte Bronte

  • He already suspected—from a brief but polite exchange of words with the class president—that their language ability might outrival the simple lessons he had developed for his Bible study class.

    Heaven Lake

  • "Ah, you know the great philosopher, then?" commented the jester from the couch, closely watching the sottish, intemperate face of his keeper, and running his glance over the unwieldy form which bade fair to outrival one of the wine butts in the castle cellar.

    Under the Rose

  • You must empty the drawing-room quite out, have the orchestra engaged, and a _menu_ that will outrival everything.

    Honor Edgeworth Ottawa's Present Tense

  • Gibbons, in old English manor-houses, outrival all the luxurious charms of modern upholstery; Phidias is a more familiar element in

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 02, No. 08, June 1858

  • Howe, and although she was not considered equal in appearance to many others, she was believed to outrival them in her powers of sailing.

    Grace Darling Heroine of the Farne Islands

  • But ambitious newspaper reporters bent themselves to this new task, as is their custom in all matters of public concern, _i.e. _, to outrival the most noted expert in the line of that particular phase of public endeavor uppermost at the time.

    An American Suffragette

  • In the same century a good and zealous nun of Saxony, Hroswitha by name, set herself to outrival

    The Growth of English Drama

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