Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Too old.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English ofereald, corresponding to over- +‎ old. Cognate with Dutch overoud, German überalt.

Examples

  • She was over-old a woman to climb three steep stairs for the sake of two young men's drought, and I (having always some regard for the frail) took the key from her hand and went, as was common enough with her younger customers, seeking my own liquor up the stair.

    John Splendid The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn

  • "Naught may I hide that King Atli is heavy of foot and over-old for the warding of his realm; but his sons are young and of no account: now will he give you rule over his realms while they are yet thus young, and most fain will he be that ye have the joy thereof before all others."

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • But his attire gleamed and glittered, since over-old was he to thrust deep into the press that day, howbeit he was wise in war.

    The House of the Wolfings

  • So these twain poured out, and the kings drank and were exceeding drunken, and Vingi notes it, and says — “Naught may I hide that King Atli is heavy of foot and over-old for the warding of his realm; but his sons are young and of no account: now will he give you rule over his realms while they are yet thus young, and most fain will he be that ye have the joy thereof before all others.”

    The Story of the Volsungs

  • "I have a few bottles of claret," he said, "-- if it should not be over-old!

    Warlock o' Glenwarlock

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