Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of overegg.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • With the nasal Thornburn and raucous Kattner trading vocals and occasionally dark lyrics, some songs strive for drama but sound overegged.

    Mister Heavenly: Out of Love – review

  • "The crowds have been way down they have overegged the pudding."

    Is Twenty20 Falling Flat?

  • It has all the makings of a classic, but the pudding's been so overegged in the press - not to mention ITV's staggeringly dull 'coverage' - that it'll probably be 40-10 to the home side.

    The Guardian World News

  • Although the performances are exaggerated, with too many overegged accents, there is some good work by George Rainsford and Trevor White, and there's an excellent design by

    Evening Standard - Home

  • She adds: It maybe overegged the pudding and maybe it did go too far.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

  • That said, IBM's Brian Truskowski rather overegged the pudding by claiming that "security is recession-proof".

    iTnews Australia

  • Bova perhaps thinks this renders his prose more vivid and immediate, but it has exactly the opposite effect, making it sticky and overegged.

    Michel Vuijlsteke's weblog

  • Especially considering that one of the only recognizable - in my case - nods to pre-Strawberry Jam material was an overegged rendition of Leaf House which collapsed under the weight of the gratuitous reverb added to Panda Bear's yodelling vocals and the dubby, slow motion re-reading of the song's original sprightly guitars.

    Irish Blogs

  • You seem to have drastically overegged your own importance, fella.

    Army Rumour Service

  • Even though there is much to like about Cardiff and Miller's work - its layerings of fiction; its plays on time and space, place and situation; its technical sophistication - it frequently misses the mark, or is so overegged as to make us not care very much about it.

    Culture | guardian.co.uk

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.