Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To invest an excessive amount

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But the focus on people leads us to overinvest in the rewards for individual innovation and underinvest in the intellectual commons that make those innovations possible.

    Facebook: Where genius was 1% inspiration, 99% timeliness

  • If you overestimate or overinvest in one part of the system, like building coastal defenses, and then you do not invest in the other parts of the system, like backup systems or redundant systems, then, you get what we just saw.

    Tsunami Warning Systems: Lessons from Japan

  • Company executives can then be blamed if they either underinvest or overinvest in spectrum.

    Dropped Call? Blame the FCC

  • But the focus on people leads us to overinvest in the rewards for individual innovation and underinvest in the intellectual commons that make those innovations possible.

    Facebook: Where genius was 1% inspiration, 99% timeliness

  • Under some circumstances, authors and technologists will overinvest because private value exceeds social value.

    IPSC: Copyright/Right of Publicity/GIs

  • Under some circumstances, authors and technologists will overinvest because private value exceeds social value.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • They give incentives for excessive risk taking, which means that banks may overinvest in risky loans something we witnessed quite clearly in the housing market leading up to the crisis.

    What Jamie Dimon Won't Tell You

  • They give incentives for excessive risk taking, which means that banks may overinvest in risky loans something we witnessed quite clearly in the housing market leading up to the crisis.

    What Jamie Dimon Won't Tell You

  • They give incentives for excessive risk taking, which means that banks may overinvest in risky loans something we witnessed quite clearly in the housing market leading up to the crisis.

    What Jamie Dimon Won't Tell You

  • They give incentives for excessive risk taking, which means that banks may overinvest in risky loans something we witnessed quite clearly in the housing market leading up to the crisis.

    What Jamie Dimon Won't Tell You

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