Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Qualmish; weak; alarmed; nervous.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From over +‎ -ish.

Examples

  • 'I don't know that I can, except in a general way, -- he was uncommonly old and uncommonly ugly, and he had a pair of the most extraordinary eyes I ever saw, -- they gave me a sort of all-overish feeling when I saw them glaring at me through the pigeon hole.

    The Beetle

  • But, as he saw her now, with her black hair and dark glowing face, walking along the pavement in her decided way, he felt, as he afterwards said, "quite all-overish like."

    The Golden Shoemaker or 'Cobbler' Horn

  • If you say that these things are mere hallucinations, vague air-beating or tale-telling, why, good philosopher, do you feel so curious, so all-overish, as it were?

    Christmas: Its Origin and Associations Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries

  • I think I'm in for an attack of flue, or something; feel shivery and all-overish.

    The Halo

  • Saving your presence, gentlemen, it made me feel all-overish like.

    The Phantom of the Opera

  • 'All-overish feelings,' Rogers helped him, seeing that he was losing confidence a little, 'vague sensations of joy and wonder and -- well -- in

    A Prisoner in Fairyland

  • He had clear, steady, humorous eyes; a manner frank and independent, not to be put upon; and yet Ethel divined, though she could not have declared, the "want" in his appearance -- that all-overish grace and elasticity which comes only from the development of the brain and nervous system.

    The Man Between: An International Romance

  • When Jim looks at me with his attractive blue eyes, and I see the D.S.O. and the M.C., and his white nice teeth -- and how his hair is brushed, and how well his uniform fits, I have a jolly all-overish sensation -- and I don't much listen to what he is saying -- he says lots of love -- and I think I would really like him all the time.

    Man and Maid

  • Then, when he has gone I think of other things, and I feel he would not understand a word about them, and because he isn't there I don't feel the delicious all-overish sensation, so I rather decide to marry Rochester -- there would be such risk -- because when you are married to a man, it is possible to get much fonder of him.

    Man and Maid

  • Wouverman's wharf, that he lost his all-overish feelings in a queer mixture of pride and sorrowfulness.

    Captains Courageous

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