Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of overmast.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • The craft's masts were, furthermore, said to be of great height, and might be recognised by their remarkable and excessive rake aft; indeed -- so asserted Cary -- her spars were of such extraordinary length, and the vessel herself lay so very low in the water, that she had the appearance of being perilously overmasted and topheavy.

    Across the Spanish Main A Tale of the Sea in the Days of Queen Bess

  • Her masts were very long and tapering, with a big rake aft, and from a distance the vessel looked overmasted; but when one got on board her one saw that her great width of beam gave her the stiffness necessary to carry such lofty masts with their corresponding spread of sail.

    Across the Spanish Main A Tale of the Sea in the Days of Queen Bess

  • She's overmasted, and the fellow who has her ought not to be trusted with her.

    "Pig-Headed" Sailor Men From "The Strange Adventure Of James Shervinton and Other Stories" - 1902

  • We find, too, that Bradford also states in his "Historie," that "the leakiness of this ship was partly by her being overmasted and too much pressed with sails."

    The Mayflower and Her Log; July 15, 1620-May 6, 1621 — Complete

  • Briefly stated, this alleged discovery, which he so zealously announces, is that if the SPEEDWELL had not been overmasted, both she and the MAY-FLOWER would have arrived early in the fall at the mouth of the Hudson River, and the whole course of New

    The Mayflower and Her Log; July 15, 1620-May 6, 1621 — Complete

  • We soon discovered that the masts which the American had sold to the schooner were much too large for her: she was considerably overmasted, and we were obliged to be very careful.

    Peter Simple

  • We soon discovered that the masts which the American had sold to the schooner, were much too large for her; she was considerably overmasted, and we were obliged to be very careful.

    Peter Simple; and, The Three Cutters, Vol. 1-2

  • Perhaps we quaffed it too constantly; since the romantic picture reduces itself for me but to two definite appearances; that of the more priggish discrimination so far reasserting itself as to advise me that Montepulciano was dirty, even remarkably dirty; and that of her being not much else besides but perched and brown and queer and crooked, and noble withal (which is what almost any Tuscan city more easily than not acquits herself of; all the while she may on such occasions figure, when one looks off from her to the end of dark street - vistas or catches glimpses through high arcades, some big battered, blistered, overladen, overmasted ship, swimming in a violet sea).

    Italian Hours

  • "Fastest vessel in the Pacific for her size, but a bit overmasted.

    Edward Barry South Sea Pearler

  • SPEEDWELL, "alleging that" they were the proximate causes of most of the troubles on the voyage [of the MAY-FLOWER] out; and of many of the deaths at Plymouth in New England in the course of the following Spring; for they overmasted the vessel, and by so doing strained her hull while sailing. "

    The Mayflower and Her Log; July 15, 1620-May 6, 1621 — Complete

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