Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To supply with too many employees: Management was careful not to overstaff the agency.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To furnish with too many staff

Etymologies

over- +‎ staff (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I would contend that McDonalds and Burger King * artificially* overstaff many restaurants to provide jobs as a form of community service.

    Coyote Blog » Blog Archive » Mix Shift?

  • Hooker says he doesn't overstaff projects but benefits from lower turnover.

    Silicon Valley's Prison Call Center

  • However, the tendency to overstaff also micro-hydro stations is a problem.

    1. BASIC APPROACH a) Cost-Benefit-Approach for Socio-Economic Selection

  • The only reason you overstaff a ship is so you have personnel redundancy in case you take battle casualties.

    Starfishers

  • In terms of keeping our workforce size appropriately, we will keep our plans slightly overstaffed or overstaff to a level that we think we could respond very rapidly if physicians want this new paradigm starts to take hold.

  • • Departments frequently overstaff checkpoints with officers, all earning overtime.

    AlterNet.org Main RSS Feed

  • Departments frequently overstaff checkpoints with officers, all earning overtime.

    AroundTheCapitol.com

  • * Departments frequently overstaff checkpoints with officers, all earning overtime.

    Bakersfield.com Latest news

  • Casinos typically overstaff for openings, however, so this may not be indicative of the downturn.

    Las Vegas News Blog

  • Under flow control, MOSA will overspend, overbuild and overstaff facilities, remain vulnerable to economic downturns, and lose waste volumes from increased recycling and other factors that affect the amount of trash locally generated.

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