Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of overtoil.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The crawl of the distant blue water, the flash of wing or sail, the taste of salt rime, the cañon shadows of the hills, the flying murk, or the last majestic and magnificent blotting out of the world as the legions of sea fog overtoiled it, all answered or soothed moods in her spirit.

    The Gray Dawn

  • Weariness and fright, thirst, the changed altitude, had overtoiled his endurance.

    Rimrock Trail

  • “Your Excellency is overtoiled in the public service,” said

    Woodstock

  • To the dullest peasant, as he sits sluggish, overtoiled, by his evening hearth, one idea has come: that of Chateaus burnt; of Chateaus combustible.

    The French Revolution

  • Every appliance that could make study pleasant and give ease to the overtoiled brain was there; chairs made to relieve each limb and muscle; reading-desks and writing-desks to suit every attitude; lamps and candles mechanically contrived to throw their light on any favoured spot, as the student might desire; a shoal of newspapers to amuse the few leisure moments which might be stolen from the labours of the day; and then from the window a view right through a bosky vista along which ran a broad green path from the rectory to the church — at the end of which the tawny-tinted fine old tower was seen with all its variegated pinnacles and parapets.

    The Warden

  • “You cannot know her,” answered Magdalen Graeme, “who knows not herself — there are times, when, in this woman’s frame of mine, there is the strength of him of Gath — in this overtoiled brain, the wisdom of the most sage counsellor — and again the mist is on me, and my strength is weakness, my wisdom folly.

    The Abbot

  • Every appliance that could make study pleasant and give ease to the overtoiled brain was there; chairs made to relieve each limb and muscle; reading-desks and writing-desks to suit every attitude; lamps and candles mechanically contrived to throw their light on any favoured spot, as the student might desire; a shoal of newspapers to amuse the few leisure moments which might be stolen from the labours of the day; and then from the window a view right through a bosky vista along which ran a broad green path from the rectory to the church, -- at the end of which the tawny-tinted fine old tower was seen with all its variegated pinnacles and parapets.

    The Warden

  • "Your Excellency is overtoiled in the public service," said Pearson; "a course of the stag in the evening will refresh you.

    Woodstock; or, the Cavalier

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