Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of overwatch.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He is my overlord, and he has overwatched me in the fosterage where he placed me when my father died.

    A Caregiver's Homage To The Very Old

  • Their emplaced sniper/killer teams SKTs overwatched the house long enough for the suspects to foolishly return to it and stroll right into the dragnet waiting for them.

    Meet The Amazing Buck Sargent

  • Some there are (as Fenestella for one) who affirm that Marius knew nothing of the fight, but, overwatched and spent with hard duty, had reposed himself, when the signal was given, beneath some shade, and was hardly to be awakened at the flight of his men.

    The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans

  • "That large spot before your eyes is a rare bird, known as an overwatched starship captain."

    The Fate of the Phoenix

  • Occasionally, though less often, one of the doors at either flank of the house, also overwatched by shining orbs, opened to discharge an early departure.

    Success A Novel

  • Yesterday she was an overwatched girl, looking yearningly at

    Who Cares? a story of adolescence

  • It was Hopkins's custom to keep the poor wretches waking, in order to prevent them from having encouragement from the devil, and, doubtless, to put infirm, terrified, overwatched persons in the next state to absolute madness; and for the same purpose they were dragged about by their keepers till extreme weariness and the pain of blistered feet might form additional inducements to confession.

    Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft

  • Then they read their nativities in the planets and felt how great must be the state overwatched by such resplendent servitors.

    The Destiny of the Soul A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life

  • At such hour the overwatched Three Hundred are not yet stirring: none but some Clerks, a company of National Guards; and M. de

    The French Revolution

  • Hopkins's custom to keep the poor wretches waking, in order to prevent them from having encouragement from the devil, and, doubiless, to put infirm, terrified, overwatched persons in the next state to absolute madness; and for the same purpose they were dragged about by their keepers till extreme weariness and the pain of blistered feet might form additional inducements to confession.

    Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.