Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The property of being one's own.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The quality of being peculiar to one's self.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He described birds 'nests -- a lifelong interest -- as tiny miracles, places of safety, of "ownness," but also of vulnerability and risk.

    A Most Prolific Peasant Poet

  • The urgency is now, this second, anyone with sagging pants should take the empowerment and ownness to pull them up, affix their belt snuggly, tighten their bootstraps, and walk with a stride that represents someone that cares about their image, self-perception, and more importantly their promising future.

    Tracey D. Smith: Charm School 101 for the College Student

  • In addition, how can one forget entirely the fact that Ereignis normally means "event," and that there are very good reasons to believe that, by understanding Sein verbally, and transitively, Ereignis does designate something like the recurrent event of being, as the giving or granting of ownness or properness?

    enowning

  • Egoism properly understood is to be identified with what Stirner calls ˜ownness

    Max Stirner

  • Consider, for example, Stirner's contrast between two different kinds of love: the ˜bad case™ where ˜ownness™ is sacrificed, and egoistic love in which self-mastery is retained.

    Max Stirner

  • First, he values ˜ownness™ neither as one good amongst many, nor as the most important of several goods, but rather as the only good.

    Max Stirner

  • Beyond all expression to have a "possession" whose "ownness" there's desperate doubt of,

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 100, May 23, 1891

  • God is the heritage of the soul in the ownness of origin; man is the offspring of his making will, of his life; God himself is his birthplace;

    Unspoken Sermons Second Series

  • For God is the heritage of the soul in the ownness of origin; man is the offspring of his making will, of his life; God himself is his birth-place; God is the self that makes the soul able to say _I too, I myself_.

    Unspoken Sermons Series I., II., and II.

  • Of course, "guilty pleasure" carries with it a healthy amount of to-each-his-ownness, too:

    EW.com: Today's Latest Headlines

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