Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The horn of an ox.
  • noun A tree, Bucida Buceras, the olivebark or black olive of Jamaica, etc. Its wood is valued as safe from insects, and its bark is used in tanning.
  • Resembling the horn of an ox.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Now, as he took the large ox-horn of our quarantine-apple cider (which we always keep apart from the rest, being too good except for the quality), he let his fingers dwell on

    Lorna Doone

  • Assuming her clothes, she comes forward, holding in her hand an ox-horn that has been filled with water from her bath; and this she sprinkles over the assembled company -- reserving a portion for the soldiers drawn up on parade beneath her window.

    The Story of Ida Pfeiffer and Her Travels in Many Lands

  • Seizing the ox-horn, he dashed its contents full in his tormentor's face, and Kurt, the Knacker, half strangled, fell back coughing and breathing stertorously.

    The Doomsman

  • From far up the avenue came the boom of an ox-horn, militant, almost brazen in its sonority.

    The Doomsman

  • One of the guardsmen held out a full ox-horn of wine, and the Knacker seized it and forced it into Constans's hand.

    The Doomsman

  • Imbrus; the waters hissed as they closed over her, and she sank into the bottom as the lead at the end of an ox-horn, that is sped to carry death to fishes.

    The Iliad of Homer

  • From an ox-horn the master blew a short, sharp recall and at once

    The Flower of the Chapdelaines

  • Then he made himself a powder-flask out of an ox-horn that he got and boiled till it was soft

    Boy Life Stories and Readings Selected From The Works of William Dean Howells

  • The sermons were preached in the morning, at noon, and at twilight, when all the multitude were summoned to the grand central stand in the square of the encampment by sounding a tin trumpet or ox-horn.

    The Memories of Fifty Years

  • Imbrus; the waters hissed as they closed over her, and she sank into the bottom as the lead at the end of an ox-horn, that is sped to carry death to fishes.

    The Iliad

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