Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In law, a hearing or trial of causes.
  • noun The production of a document or copy of a document which an adversary has mentioned in his pleading; anciently, the hearing of the reading of such document. In early times often called oyer and determiner.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Law) A hearing or an inspection, as of a deed, bond, etc., .
  • noun (Law) a term used in England in commissions directed to judges of assize about to hold court, directing them to hear and determine cases brought before them. In the U.S. the phrase is used to designate certain criminal courts.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun law, archaic A hearing in a civil case which is based on the content of a document, in which the plaintiff is required to produce the document.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Mr. Rich, as solicitor general, I appoint you and Mr. Cromwell to head a commission of oyer and terminer to investigate whether these offenses be true.

    The Tudors: King Takes Queen

  • Mr. Rich, as solicitor general, I appoint you and Mr. Cromwell to head a commission of oyer and terminer to investigate whether these offenses be true.

    The Tudors: King Takes Queen

  • Mr. Rich, as solicitor general, I appoint you and Mr. Cromwell to head a commission of oyer and terminer to investigate whether these offenses be true.

    The Tudors: King Takes Queen

  • Some colonies borrowed from the English the idea of roving courts—courts of oyer and terminer and general gaol delivery.

    A History of American Law

  • In 1683, Governor Dongan appointed him a judge of the court of oyer and terminer.161 In Massachusetts, too, most good lawyers in the generation after 1690 at one time or another held appointive office.162

    A History of American Law

  • In 1683, Governor Dongan appointed him a judge of the court of oyer and terminer.161 In Massachusetts, too, most good lawyers in the generation after 1690 at one time or another held appointive office.162

    A History of American Law

  • In Delaware, there were courts of oyer and terminer, and courts of general sessions and jail delivery.

    A History of American Law

  • In Delaware, there were courts of oyer and terminer, and courts of general sessions and jail delivery.

    A History of American Law

  • Some colonies borrowed from the English the idea of roving courts—courts of oyer and terminer and general gaol delivery.

    A History of American Law

  • In Delaware, there were courts of oyer and terminer, and courts of general sessions and jail delivery.

    A History of American Law

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