Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of pailful.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • These were hardly 'pailfuls'; but gold is an article which adds fervour to the imagination and almost creates a power for romance.

    John Caldigate

  • Intelligence fills the brain with more of these elements; like the child with pailfuls of Legos, the highly intelligent person has a greater chance of forming the novel combinations of ideas, images or symbols that constitute a masterpiece than does someone with a mere starter set.

    The Puzzle Of Genius

  • These were hardly ‘pailfuls’; but gold is an article which adds fervour to the imagination and almost creates a power for romance.

    John Caldigate

  • If it should thunder as it did before, I know not where to hide my head: yond same cloud cannot choose but fall by pailfuls.

    The Tempest

  • I was surprised to see how thirsty the bricks were which drank up all the moisture in my plaster before I had smoothed it, and how many pailfuls of water it takes to christen a new hearth.

    Walden

  • Rain is descending in pailfuls, and it is such a soaking kind of rain that — that you might catch cold from it, my darling, and the chill might go to your heart.

    Poor Folk

  • Above eighteen pailfuls or two of it are got down my gullet; bous, bhous, bhous, bhous, how damned bitter and salt it is!

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • I imagined Dandy Boy drinking pailfuls of it and afterward rearing up like a cowboy's horse.

    Borrowed Finery, A Memoir

  • Food is cheap and seems to be plentiful; and inexplicably in the Dry Zone, four hundred miles long and seventy-five broad, where it had not rained for over five months, one sees Burmese pouring pailfuls of water over their heads to cool themselves (I tried it: one shivers with cold for a minute and then dries and continues to gasp and perspire in the heat).

    Burma

  • Sure that he would find plenty of porridge in the kettles, he drew out his father's travelling kettle and went with it to the cook of their kurén, who was sleeping beside two big cauldrons, holding about ten pailfuls, under which the ashes still glowed.

    Taras Bulba and Other Tales

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