Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of paint.
  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of paint.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • TC Moses - The title paints a picture of a place that many of us want to escape to when life beats you down.

    Dancetracks Digital: New Downloads

  • (June 13) This term paints Israel as the source of the conflict, and denies the sworn, documented commitment of Hamas and other terrorist groups to destroy Israel

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  • (June 13) This term paints Israel as the source of the conflict, and denies the sworn, documented commitment of Hamas and other terrorist groups to destroy Israel

    undefined

  • (June 13) This term paints Israel as the source of the conflict, and denies the sworn, documented commitment of Hamas and other terrorist groups to destroy Israel

    undefined

  • (June 13) This term paints Israel as the source of the conflict, and denies the sworn, documented commitment of Hamas and other terrorist groups to destroy Israel

    undefined

  • (June 13) This term paints Israel as the source of the conflict, and denies the sworn, documented commitment of Hamas and other terrorist groups to destroy Israel

    undefined

  • The image the book paints is a writer who cared little for his family, leaving his wife and child in Stratford-upon-Avon and spending the duration of his life in London ignoring them.

    2010 March 04 « The BookBanter Blog

  • Green Arrow floats somewhere in the middle and, aside from bland paints, is a fantastic representation of the character.

    Collectible Review: Heroes of DC Green Arrow Bust | Fandomania

  • Also, even if we think we might want to capture a beautiful sunset in paints, we are afraid to appear foolish.

    Quote of the day

  • The image the book paints is a writer who cared little for his family, leaving his wife and child in Stratford-upon-Avon and spending the duration of his life in London ignoring them.

    “Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare” by Stephen Greenblatt (Norton, 2004) « The BookBanter Blog

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