Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The time when animals, as birds, pair for breeding; mating-time.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • What is it the birds sing among the trees in pairing-time?

    Virginibus Puerisque and other papers

  • The little gentleman looked very smiling at the landlady, who smiled even more cordially in return, and adjusted her cap-ribbon with an unconscious movement, -- a reminiscence of the long-past pairing-time, when she had smoothed her locks and softened her voice, and won her mate by these and other bird-like graces.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 23, September, 1859

  • In some migrants the males arrive before the females, and no sooner have they recovered from the effects of their journey than they burst out into rapturous singing; these are not love-strains, since the females have not yet arrived, and pairing-time is perhaps a mouth distant; their singing merely expresses their overflowing gladness.

    The Naturalist in La Plata

  • The female is an ill-favoured thing who knows naught of the delights of flying: all her life long, she retains the larval shape, which, for the rest, is similar to that of the male, who himself is imperfect so long as he has not achieved the maturity that comes with pairing-time.

    The Glow-Worm and Other Beetles

  • The exalting effect of love is well known; its inciting and glorifying power is seen even in birds and beasts at the pairing-time, in a new brilliancy of plumage, and a wonderful increase of courage.

    The Friendships of Women

  • The Little Gentleman looked very smiling at the landlady, who smiled even more cordially in return, and adjusted her cap-ribbon with an unconscious movement, -- a reminiscence of the long-past pairing-time, when she had smoothed her locks and softened her voice, and won her mate by these and other bird-like graces.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. Works

  • Among the monogamous birds several are to be found, after pairing-time, single, and of each sex; but whether this state of celibacy is matter of choice or necessity, is not so easy discoverable.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1

  • Another instance I remember of a sportsman, whose zeal for the increase of his game being greater than his humanity, after pairing-time he always shot the cock-bird of every couple of partridges upon his grounds; supposing that the rivalry of many males interrupted the breed: he used to say, that, though he had widowed the same hen several times, yet he found she was still provided with a fresh paramour, that did not take her away from her usual haunt.

    The Natural History of Selborne, Vol. 1

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